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How common are Woolly-coated Siberian Huskies?

How common are Woolly-coated Siberian Huskies? Topic: Test case structure
June 19, 2019 / By Dolores
Question: I've become very interested in the Woollies after learning that my husky boy is one! So interested that I'm wanting another... We have always planned on bringing another husky into our home after our first was well trained. My first question is concerning the genetics of woollies. Is the trait recessive, meaning that both parents must at least carry the woolly gene to have a woolly pup? Can it be displayed by partial dominance? (Any pup who is heterozygous for the trait may still exhibit the woolly gene, and a homozygous recessive dog would have full exhibition of the gene?) Or is it a mutation, which is a random mistake in DNA coding but can also be perpetuated by bad breeding, and be passed down from parents as well? (as in the case of down syndrome - parents with down syndrome have a 50% chance of passing it on to offspring.) My second question is how can I find one of these puppies? If it does occur within good breeding lines, how often can I expect that? I realize that a woolly coat is a default in the breed, and such a pup wouldn't be of much use to a professional breeder. I also know of one breeder who breeds woollies specifically, despite the trait being considered a default. I would never use this pup for breeding or showing purposes, so this is not a concern to me. However, I do see the problem with breeding these dogs in this way: the entire purpose of professional dog breeding is the betterment of the breed, and this seems to defy that. Whatever husky we bring home I know we'll love, but I want to explore the possibilities. As our first dog was a rescue, we spent a lot of time, effort, and money rehabilitating him and getting him healthy again. Unfortunately we are not in the position to take the risk of adopting again right now, though we do know it will greatly benefit our family and our husky to find him a friend (as huskies like to be part of a pack - a human one may not be enough). So we are most interested in finding a pup from a good, loving home this time, and good breeding lines. Thank you so much for taking the time to read my extremely long question... and thanks in advance for helping :) Seen the website, thank you. Not enough info for me... just barely touches on the subject, really... I know what the breed standard is, as I stated in my question. My own husky has several faults with the standard, he is going to be too tall and heavy as an adult, his eyes are too offset, and of course, the woolly coat... I am well aware that the woollies are outside of the standard.
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Best Answers: How common are Woolly-coated Siberian Huskies?

Caron Caron | 10 days ago
The fluffy gene has recently been located, and can now be tested for. http://www.vetgen.com/canine-coat-length... . It is a recessive gene which must be present in two copies to be expressed. My feeling would be that since this test is now offered, fewer woolies will be produced by reputable breeders. The breeders who deliberately breeding for this will likely be focusing on this one characteristic. Often, this means that the overall structure or health or temperament of an animal will take a backseat to the length and texture of it's coat. This rarely makes for better than inferior animals.
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Caron Originally Answered: Do Siberian Huskies eat cats?
A Husky has an extremely strong prey drive. This cannot be trained out of them any more than the desire to run, dig or shed. Some of them will kill a cat in an instant. Some will not ... they may wait awhile until you least expect it. Even if introduced to a cat as a puppy a Husky should not be trusted alone with the cat. And other cats are not at all safe. Don’t get me wrong, the Siberian Husky is a great breed of dog, and I wouldn’t have anything else, BUT ask yourself, why do you want a Husky? Because of a couple of movies maybe? It doesn't sound as if you have done enough homework on the breed. These are NOT "starter" dogs by any stretch of the imagination. They REQUIRE a very experienced owner! Huskies are a special breed that most definitely is not for everyone. Yes, they are beautiful. Everybody loves them until they get one and find out how much work they really are. Then they wind up in a shelter or worse due to no fault of their own. They have many good points as well as bad. Some of the good points: 1. They love all people of all ages. 2. They love company. 3. They are extremely intelligent. 4. They are easygoing and forgiving. 5. They are clean with little or no “doggy” smell. Some people who are allergic to other breeds can live with Huskies. 6. They are generally quiet. They rarely bark except in playing, but will “talk” or howl like their wolf ancestors for no reason. 7. They don’t require a lot of food. (get good fuel mileage) 8. They are honest. Their body language and voice can be taken at face value 9. They are not fussy eaters and will eat pretty much anything that doesn’t eat them first. But they do require a proper diet. (see # 6 below) 10. They usually get along with other well adjusted canines but they will take up a challenge if offered. Some of the bad points: 1. They love people …. any people. This is sometimes seen as a lack of loyalty. 2. I do not believe that there is a type of dog that could be friendlier than a Husky. A Husky may alert you by his actions (running to a door or window etc) but he is not a watchdog by any stretch if the imagination. On the contrary, he will invite the bad guy in and show him where the good stuff is. And then help carry it out! It's in the breeding and I doubt that you can train them otherwise. Even if you abuse them (we have several that were very abused) they do not become mean ... they will just shy away from you. It's possible that they may (or may not) defend you against an attacker (more likely with an animal attacker). He very well may be a deterrent to someone looking to do bad stuff .... a “hungry wolf looking” dog looking back at them through the window .... 3. They have a STRONG desire to run. This was bred into them over many hundreds of generations. It cannot be trained out of them in a few months of obedience classes. They MUST be kept in a secure area. And taken out in open areas on a leash. They are escape artists like a hairy Houdini. They have been known to jump or climb over 6 foot fences. If they can’t go over it they will go under it. 4. They are extremely intelligent and mischievous. You have to be smarter than they are to stay ahead of them. Don’t laugh. It’s true, they are smarter than most people. 5. They are too independent and strong willed to make it through obedience training. (see # 4 above). They will know and understand the command but if they don’t see the point in carrying it out they won’t. 6. They are very keen and efficient hunter / killers. 7. They must be kept occupied. A BORED HUSKY IS A DESTRUCTIVE HUSKY! (see # 10 on below) 8. They shed. A LOT! Year round. Then twice a year or more they will “blow” their coats. This takes shedding to a whole new level. 9. They dig …. A LOT! You could rent your yard to NASA to train astronauts on. 10. They play ROUGH! Very rough. And they sometimes can draw blood. But it is still play. 11. They need company, either human or canine and will be miserable without it. Though they can survive outdoors they really need to be inside with their “pack”……. YOU! 12. They can live 12 to 14 years. Maybe longer. This is not a bad thing. But can YOU live with a 2 year old that long? That’s what it’s like with a Husky in your life. Again DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Know what you are getting yourself into. If you can't handle the challenge unfortunately it will be the Husky that pays the price. If you do decide that you can handle the challenge, go through a rescue group. DON'T go to a pet shop or a back yard breeder. 25 years of being owned by Siberian Huskies. I currently have 14 Huskies most of whom were rescued by us from people who didn’t know what they were getting into

Angeline Angeline
Yes, the trait is recessive to my knowledge. As for finding one of the pups, that's going to be a bit more difficult. The reason being is because they are described and advertised as "rare", therefore they will be more desirable than the standard coat Husky, making more money for the breeder. Irresponsible breeders love this type of thing. The purpose of responsible dog breeding is to better the breed, yes. However, it can also go both ways depending on the breeder and what they are looking for in the future. For instance, there are many mixes that are created. Some will state they breed them to develop a new breed when it's a crock. But I have seen some that may make it there in the future. The Carlin Pinscher is one that springs to mind. While i'm not necessarily fond of the idea of creating new breeds when we have plenty already, it seems as though certain breeders are very interested in the dogs that they are breeding and are doing it in a responsible manner. The Alaskan Klee Kai is another. Not recognized by the AKC, but being properly developed by the "breed club" with individuals very interested in getting said dog recognized. You could probably find a good breeder that does the wooly coat. It will be a bit of a challenge, yet just because they are attempting a different coat type doesn't necessarily make them a bad breeder. It just means that you need to be more careful in finding someone that is responsible and isn't contributing to the already overwhelming overpopulation problem. Because the coat isn't recognized and is considered a fault, some will disagree with me on this, while others will agree. Just be sure to do your research, look at their contract, etc.
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Willard Willard
This Site Might Help You. RE: How common are Woolly-coated Siberian Huskies? I've become very interested in the Woollies after learning that my husky boy is one! So interested that I'm wanting another... We have always planned on bringing another husky into our home after our first was well trained. My first question is concerning the genetics of woollies. Is...
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Seamour Seamour
It all depends on where the dog comes from and how you raise it...to a point. I had a female siberian husky and she peaked at probably 75 lbs at one point( muscle not fat). they have a ton of energy and if you dont run them they will probably destroy whatever they can get at. They are incredible intelligent, mine could open doors, release the latch on its chain ( we put 2 hooks on it after a while and it would still manage to open them sometimes). Just because they are smart doesnt mean they will do what you want, it probably will learn what you want it to do really quick but probably wont do it, you have to make them respect you or they wont listen to you at all. My husky was agressive and would only listen to me, it would routinely hunt down small animals but was friendly to people most of the time unless it was eating. Siberian huskies like to run to, and if it gets loose and its not trained chances are it will go for a little tour with out you. I think they make good loyal pets and they will protect you but im not sure how caring they are. Siberian huskies are more of a work dog and i mean that they should be used as sled dogs or maybe by someone who spends alot of time hiking or camping in the woods because i would not keep them if i had a family (simply dont trust them around people they dont know, mine had pretty random mood swings). Beutiful dog and I liked mine, but i probably wont get another. P.s. Im 90% sure mine had an attitude problem because it was in general not a very nice dog, it would not listen to anyone other than me and if you took its food or startled it she would growl at you at the very least ( and she would bite people too, but not badly...more of a stay away from me type of thing) but aside from that it was a great dog whenever i was hiking or in the woods, i could always count on it but i wouldnt trust it around other people.
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Ned Ned
My female is part Wooley. Strange I know. Her father is very wooley but mother is smoothe. We rescued her after she had 8 puppies. I've contacted the breeder who surrendered her and she gave me the name of the breeder she came from. Only one of her 8 puppies she had is also part wooley, a little more so then she is. I think is has to do with genetics. Just like you can attempt to breed for eye color but the majority of breeders who do this don't care about the health of the dog and some go as far as inbreeding. My advice would be to look around siberian husky rescues. The majority of the dogs are 1-2 yrs of age. Every now and then you can find a wooley. Good luck! http://www.adoptahusky.com/education/AAH...
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Kevyn Kevyn
this site is pretty good for information about huskies.. http://www.huskycolors.com/wooly.html From what I understand.. its a rare recessive gene. Both parents have to carry the gene in order to get a pup with the wooly coat. Since reputable breeders strive to create dogs that fit standard, they will not purposly breed to achieve this coat type.. infact they will try their best to breed away from the gene... so its not very likely to find a wooly coat from a responsible breeder.. not impossible, but not likely. If you're wanting that coat, I suggest you start contacting breeders, and get on several waiting lists for one. You may have to wait several years before one comes along. Its good that you have no intentions of breeding, as a reputable breeder would only sell this coat type as a "pet" quality and require it to be spayed/neutered. ADDED Try talking to members of the breed club.. they may be able to provide more information for you.. http://www.shca.org/index.shtml
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Hudson Hudson
Many people love the idea of owning a dog but one thing that they have to keep in mind often times, is that the dog needs to be trained. Learn here http://OnlineDogTraining.enle.info/?L7Mp While the pet may look heart-breakingly cute when it's in a shelter or at the pound, picking out the dog is only the first part of the relationship between dog owner and the animal. Many people don't understand that they have to put time and effort into socializing the dog. An unsocialized dog will intimidate others, tear up the home, and will create an environment that can become so bad that the it will have to be returned. Many times when dogs have to be returned to shelters or to other resources, it will end up euthanized, which is very heartbreaking. All of this can be spared if a person learns the various techniques in order to socialize the dog. One thing that they have to understand is that the he wants to be told what to do. It's in the canine nature to follow a leader. The dog will be more than willing to obey the leadership of its master. Here's a look at some common techniques that are used in dog training: "Dog Whispering" This is a technique that has been around for a while, but gained national notoriety over the last 10 years. Some people might hear this term and wonder how in the world whispering to a dog can train it! Whispering isn't meant to be taken literally in this case. As trainers have shown, whispering is a term that refers to connecting with a being or an entity on a very deep and almost spiritual level. When it comes to dog training techniques, dog whispering involves careful observation of the dog's behavior and actions. It literally entails getting inside the mind and the behavior system of the canine. When a person uses dog whispering techniques, they interact with the dog on the canine level. Again, one the most common mistakes that people make is treating the dog like a small human being. "Reward Training" Reward training is very simple and it's one of the older tricks that works. This is a simple method of training the dog by positive reinforcement. Once he does what it is told to do, it receives a treat. How this works is that the dog owner must entice the dog towards the treat. Once the canine develops awareness for the treat, it develops a strong desire for it. When the desire for it is extremely strong, the dog owner pulls back. Then the dog receives a command and when the dog obeys the command, it receives the treat. The object is to make the dog associate a treat with the command. "Clicker Training" Other dog training techniques include one that is similar to reward training, which is called clicker training. How this works is that the clicker is incorporated to get the dog's attention. The clicker is clicked as a form of communication with the dog. It learns that there is a command or reward associated in conjunction with the clicker. Many people claim that this is fun, and they actually make a game with the dog by using the clicker for their dog training tasks. "Ultrasonic Whistle" Last, a relatively new form of dog training technique is called the ultrasonic whistle. This works because the ultrasonic sound is only heard by the dog. When the owner is trying to communicate a command, or stop the dog from barking, they will blow on their whistle when they want to communicate a command to the dog. The benefit of this is that the humans can't hear this noise, but the dog can hear it, and they will learn to associate the sound with a command. Dog training techniques aren't hard to incorporate, but they are something that absolutely must be incorporated from the time a dog owner brings their new dog home. No matter how old or how young the dog is, they will need training. Once they are trained properly, they will be a wonderful addition to one's family.
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Enos Enos
Buying from a breeder who is going opposite to bred standard is Only encourage irrepsonsible breeding. Coat The coat of the Siberian Husky is double and medium in length, giving a well furred appearance, but is never so long as to obscure the clean-cut outline of the dog. The undercoat is soft and dense and of sufficient length to support the outer coat. The guard hairs of the outer coat are straight and somewhat smooth lying, never harsh nor standing straight off from the body. It should be noted that the absence of the undercoat during the shedding season is normal. Trimming of whiskers and fur between the toes and around the feet to present a neater appearance is permissible. Trimming the fur on any other part of the dog is not to be condoned and should be severely penalized. Faults--Long, rough, or shaggy coat; texture too harsh or too silky; trimming of the coat, except as permitted above Dogs over 23½ inches and bitches over 22 inches. http://www.akc.org/breeds/siberian_husky/ Here are a list of breeder of Siberian husky http://www.shca.org/shcahp4f.htm
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Colbert Colbert
Have you looked at this website? They breed and sell woolly coated huskies and malamutes. http://www.siberianhuskypups.org/mycusto...
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Colbert Originally Answered: Do Siberian Huskies make good pets?
Don’t get me wrong, the Siberian Husky is a great breed of dog, and I wouldn’t have anything else, BUT ask yourself, why do you want a Husky? Because of a couple of movies maybe? It doesn't sound as if you have done enough homework on the breed. These are NOT "starter" dogs by any stretch of the imagination. They REQUIRE a very experienced owner! Huskies are a special breed that most definitely is not for everyone. Yes, they are beautiful. Everybody loves them until they get one and find out how much work they really are. Then they wind up in a shelter or worse due to no fault of their own. They have many good points as well as bad. Some of the good points: 1. They love all people of all ages. 2. They love company. 3. They are extremely intelligent. 4. They are easygoing and forgiving. 5. They are clean with little or no “doggy” smell. Some people who are allergic to other breeds can live with Huskies. 6. They are generally quiet. They rarely bark except in playing, but will “talk” or howl like their wolf ancestors for no reason. 7. They don’t require a lot of food. (get good fuel mileage) 8. They are honest. Their body language and voice can be taken at face value 9. They are not fussy eaters and will eat pretty much anything that doesn’t eat them first. But they do require a proper diet. (see # 6 below) 10. They usually get along with other well adjusted canines but they will take up a challenge if offered. Some of the bad points: 1. They love people …. any people. This is sometimes seen as a lack of loyalty. 2. I do not believe that there is a type of dog that could be friendlier than a Husky. A Husky may alert you by his actions (running to a door or window etc) but he is not a watchdog by any stretch if the imagination. On the contrary, he will invite the bad guy in and show him where the good stuff is. And then help carry it out! It's in the breeding and I doubt that you can train them otherwise. Even if you abuse them (we have several that were very abused) they do not become mean ... they will just shy away from you. It's possible that they may (or may not) defend you against an attacker (more likely with an animal attacker). He very well may be a deterrent to someone looking to do bad stuff .... a “hungry wolf looking” dog looking back at them through the window .... 3. They have a STRONG desire to run. This was bred into them over many hundreds of generations. It cannot be trained out of them in a few months of obedience classes. They MUST be kept in a secure area. And taken out in open areas on a leash. They are escape artists like a hairy Houdini. They have been known to jump or climb over 6 foot fences. If they can’t go over it they will go under it. 4. They are extremely intelligent and mischievous. You have to be smarter than they are to stay ahead of them. Don’t laugh. It’s true, they are smarter than most people. 5. They are too independent and strong willed to make it through obedience training. (see # 4 above). They will know and understand the command but if they don’t see the point in carrying it out they won’t. 6. They are very keen and efficient hunter / killers. 7. They must be kept occupied. A BORED HUSKY IS A DESTRUCTIVE HUSKY! (see # 10 on below) 8. They shed. A LOT! Year round. Then twice a year or more they will “blow” their coats. This takes shedding to a whole new level. 9. They dig …. A LOT! You could rent your yard to NASA to train astronauts on. 10. They play ROUGH! Very rough. And they sometimes can draw blood. But it is still play. 11. They need company, either human or canine and will be miserable without it. Though they can survive outdoors they really need to be inside with their “pack”……. YOU! 12. They can live 12 to 14 years. Maybe longer. This is not a bad thing. But can YOU live with a 2 year old that long? That’s what it’s like with a Husky in your life. Huskies will do well in your area. Their coats will insolate them from heat as well as cold to a certain degree. But they can overheat, like you, and they will need to have access to a cool area like an air conditioned room to cool off as needed. They will need a good supply of cool water and shade too. Ours love their "kiddie" pool too. We live in coastal NC where the summer temps are 99 degrees with 99 % humidity. I seriously doubt that it gets much worse than that there. A lot of our kids will go out and lay on our deck, in the sun, and work on their tans, though we don't let them do it for long. They will slow down in their activities too. DO NOT shave them as some people on this site suggest. This will actually harm him in several ways. There are some so called "professional" groomers out there who tell you to shave your Husky. They may even do it without asking your consent! And there are vets who will tell you to shave your Husky. These people are TOTALLY unfamiliar with the breed. Again DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Know what

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