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Overclocking Ati Radeon HD 3600, need input?

Overclocking Ati Radeon HD 3600, need input? Topic: Hot case set
June 19, 2019 / By Dayna
Question: A little (ok it came out big, but it has all the need-to-know) background story: The card (Ati Radeon HD 3600) used to be used in a media center and sat in a case hidden under the bed on hot days, running at constant 90+ temps and never had any problems. That went on for at least a year. I now use it in my computer and I do a lot of gaming. With regular settings my card stays around 55-60c while doing regular things (surfing the web, etc.) While gaming the card runs up to around 80-85c in demanding situations, regular gaming it stays in the mid-upper 70's. Though the card's seen a lot of high temperatures it's never had any problems. I'm fully aware that this is an old gpu, and it's become clear while running some games. While running WoW I can keep my settings pretty high (most setting maxed) while still achieving 40-60 fps, 15-25 in very demanding situations. More demanding games, such as Rift, never reach over 20 fps. That being said I want to dabble in overclocking. I've read that overclocking using catalyst control is safe. Even though that's what I've read, I know that my card runs hot. But at the same time, I know my card can handle the heat well. A sort of pros and cons list. Catalyst allows me to clock my gpu to 750mhz and the memory to 525mhz. The card is currently at 725mhz for gpu and 500mhz for memory. *Now the question: What would be a safe starting point for overclocking? Any temperatures I mention in this post are the graphics cards temperatures, and are celcius. I've also tried overclocking it in the past (it was a hot day and I knew substantially less about computers) using catalyst and the temperature jumped up to over 90 degrees in the 20 seconds I tested it in WoW. I saw an increase of around 10 fps at the same time. I don't remember what I clocked it to, I just know I used catalyst.
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Briar Briar | 3 days ago
I was overclocking CPUs when the 486 processor was the hottest new thing. In general it was safe to overclock a CPU by 20 percent or less. The numbers you listed, 725 to 750 and 500 to 525, shouldn't cause any problems. But that small of an increase isn't going to provide any noticeable improvement either.
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Briar Originally Answered: Overclocking Ati Radeon HD 3600, need input?
I was overclocking CPUs when the 486 processor was the hottest new thing. In general it was safe to overclock a CPU by 20 percent or less. The numbers you listed, 725 to 750 and 500 to 525, shouldn't cause any problems. But that small of an increase isn't going to provide any noticeable improvement either.

Briar Originally Answered: Can I have input on my custom computer build?
I really like the way you are going about this - building it on paper first, so to speak. :) Well, let's take a look... I have bad news, I'm afraid. If you are into CAD stuff, only an Intel i7 processor will do. You need all the power you can get for CAD stuff. Here is your new processor: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as... Afraid the motherboard is for AMD. Here is your new motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as... You could also use this if you wanted: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as... It has lotsa inputs and outputs. :) Afraid the hard drive is a mobile hard drive. (Aintcha glad I saw this question??? :D) Here is your new hard drive: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148834 or this one. Both are fine hard drives. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136792 Well, you got close on the RAM, but no cigar. You need 16 - 32 GB for CAD work. Good brand, though. Any of the top brands will do fine. :) If you go beyond 16 GB, you have to upgrade the Windows OS from Home to Professional to use more than 16 GB of RAM. I like NZXT cases. Or Rosewill cases. Rather than the Source 210, I'd rather see ya go with the M59 or the Gamma case. They have a better side window, and seem better built, being steel and all. Either one would be a choice of mine. The 500 watt power supply won't do. You need a 750 or 850. When they say 500 watts, they mean it will barely run with 500 watts. I would get at least a 750 to power it. I am using an 850 myself, to power one 6870 and standard computer configuration (sometimes I have alodda hard drives, if I'm backing up). So... 3 hard drives sometimes, One Intel i5 CPU, one 6870 graphics card, and, um, whatever else is in there... :D I strongly recommend a 750 or 850 watt power supply, because if you buy one, you want to be able to move it to your next system. Also, you want extra power for whatever you might add to your present system. The big names are great, but expensive. Why not consider Rosewill? Make sure it is single 12 volt rail, 80+, and modular, so you don't have all the unused wires hanging around, cluttering up everything (found that out the hard way! :O). Thermaltake is another quality inexpensive one. Snoop around Newegg, and see what you like best. Pick yourself a nice 750 or 850 out of that. It doesn't have to be expensive - many of them are, but some of them are not. Here's the one I use - $110 for 850 watts! 69 Amps on the 12 volt rail - will handle your current system and you future system! :D http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-153-106&SortField=1&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Keywords=%28keywords%29&Page=1#scrollFullInfo (Stay away from Corsair power supplies. They are really expensive, and have this MOST annoying habit of the fan staying totally off until they get hot, then coming on with a vengeance, then shutting totally off, then coming on high, then going off -- MOST irritating, and nothing you can do about it. I saw a video from a guy that experienced this. He even called the factory to see if something could be done - they said no, that's how they're made. :( What you want is a power supply that has the fan on SLOW all the time - and that's how they all do it, except for Corsair.) You should always have more power than you need. :) If you are short of money, ask for money for a computer for a graduation present, even if alot of people will chip in. If they see their money is going for a good cause, it will cause them to give more. :) I hope you like all this - it took me 2 hours to write it! :O ~Cindy! :)
Briar Originally Answered: Can I have input on my custom computer build?
They are all compatible. Although, to take advantage of your motherboard sockets for your CPU, consider getting an AM3+ CPU as well. Or downgrade your Mobo.

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