5321 Shares

How to use "to be angry" in a sentence?

How to use "to be angry" in a sentence? Topic: Sentence writing paper
July 24, 2019 / By Palmer
Question: Someone wrote: It Is Better To Cry Than To Be Angry Because Anger Hurts Other, While Tears Flow Silently Through The Soul and Cleanses The HEART. 1. Is this passage uses good English? 2. I wonder if "to be angry" in the sentence is correct? 3. Please give examples of some correct sentences using "to be angry".
Best Answer

Best Answers: How to use "to be angry" in a sentence?

Linus Linus | 8 days ago
How to use "to be angry" in a sentence? "to be+noun" or "to be+adjective" phrases are called noun phrases. Use them as you would use any other noun like 'car', 'dream' or 'paper bag' etc. Someone wrote: It Is Better To Cry Than To Be Angry Because Anger Hurts Other, While Tears Flow Silently Through The Soul and Cleanses The HEART. 1. Is this passage uses good English? (CORRECTION: "Does this passage use good English?") Yes it is in good English but there is no need to capitalize the first letter of each word. This makes it an error. 2. I wonder if "to be angry" in the sentence is correct? Yes, in the sentence you just presented, "to be angry" is correct. 3. Please give examples of some correct sentences using "to be angry". Make parallel comparison. Remember, "to be angry" is a noun: a) A car is not suitable for this road. >>>>>>> To be angry is not suitable in this situation. b) I want some sugar. >>>>>>> I want to be angry. c) It's a balloon, not a ball. >>>>>>> Try to be calm, not to be angry. Hope it helped. Cheers .
👍 124 | 👎 8
Did you like the answer? How to use "to be angry" in a sentence? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: Sentence writing paper


Linus Originally Answered: Native speakers help me, please. What does this sentence mean? I don't think it is a sentence, it has no main clause?
Yes, it is grammatically correct. It's a little elliptical, but no native speaker could misunderstand it. Some of the words have been omitted because they are "understood." Here is the sentence with the omitted words added in: > School pupils need to be told more about the effects of bad diet, said Bhugra: "If children are taught about the impact that food has on their growth, and that some things can harm [them,] [ ... well then, in that case,] at least [the] information is available [to them] up front." Speakers often drop words which function merely as "grammatical explainers," but which don't add any new information. They do that to make their sentences less clunky and dull, and to let them flow more smoothly and swiftly.
Linus Originally Answered: Native speakers help me, please. What does this sentence mean? I don't think it is a sentence, it has no main clause?
Your sentences all have main clauses, whose verbs are, successively, "said", "ought", "said", "urged". The sentence you cite is a subordinate clause whose main verb is "is" ("information is available..."), with its own subordinate clause "if children are taught..." What is misleading is the omission of quotation marks around "shool pupils need to be told...diet" which is the object of "said Bhugra" but is continued "if children..." To understand it, reword it as "Bhugra said "school pupils need to be told more about the effects of bad diet; if children are taught about the impact that food has on their growth, and that some things can harm, [then] at least [that] information is available up front"
Linus Originally Answered: Native speakers help me, please. What does this sentence mean? I don't think it is a sentence, it has no main clause?
It does have a main clause: ...at least information is available up front. 'Information' is the subject. 'Is' is the verb. The 'if' clause is a subordinate clause.

Jarrod Jarrod
the angry part of the sentence is fine; it has other issues though: It is better to cry than to be angry because anger hurts OTHERS, while tears flow silently through the soul and CLEANSE the heart. other example: "I used to be angry whenever he said unkind things to me, but now I know not to take it personally."
👍 40 | 👎 2

Jarrod Originally Answered: What is it called when u use a word in a sentence, twice but the second sentence changes the meaning?
An example would help. Not clear to me what you mean. There can be no security without development and no development without security. (Kofi Annan). --This is antimetabole. cf. Just turn left and you'll be right. Just turn right and you'll be left. antithesis?
Jarrod Originally Answered: What is it called when u use a word in a sentence, twice but the second sentence changes the meaning?
What I don't get is, how can you paint this horrible picture of all the terrible things he has done to you. Beating you, cheating on you, lying to you, getting another girl pregnant, and then end it by saying you have a GOOD relationship? Sorry honey but your relationship is FAR from being good. You need to walk away from this creep forever and move on, he will only continue to do what he has done, and it will even get worse. Or ignore what I've just said, and I PROMISE in s short time to come you will be going through more crap with him. Markmy words! He WILL ONLY HURT YOU AGAIN IN SOME WAY>

If you have your own answer to the question sentence writing paper, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.